Ready or Not: 3 Steps to a Successful Launch

Free Resource: Quick Check Weekend Observations

If you’re just starting out in Multisite, maintaining minimum standards may seem to be a manageable feat. For the most part, at two locations, it is. You essentially replicate what is working. Why reinvent the wheel? It’s a great starting point. However, the key to success in multisite is healthy systems that are built to last but can be adapted as growth occurs and expansion is needed. Think of it as adding spokes to the wheel. You’re going to be driving a bigger machine that will need better alignment and additional support.

Wondering where to start? Here are 3 goals for system implementation.

Define Excellence

I define excellence as, “the minimum standard required to make a positive and impressive impact.” Excellence is always the goal. Therefore, anything below this standard is unacceptable. When communicating excellence, it’s important to describe it in a manner that is easily understood and reproducible. Point to a situation and say, “This is great! Do this again.” or “How do you feel when you are being served at Chick-Fil-A or assisted at Publix?” Don’t negate the importance of emotion when identifying and labeling excellence with your teams.

Clarify Expectations

Written guidelines. Written guidelines. Written guidelines. Your expectations must be written down and distributed. Defining excellence is about emotional inspiration, but clarifying expectations is about practical application. What must your teams do in order to meet your minimum standards, your definition of excellence. Don’t assume your leaders know. Take the guesswork out of the equation and give them a framework to operate within.

Build Excitement

When your teams have a clear understanding of what excellence looks like and what is required of them, anticipation begins to develop. A healthy team is a hungry team. Once excellence has been achieved and unity has been established, there is a natural tendency for leaders to look around and ask, “What’s next?” When this occurs, it’s only a matter of time before an upsurge of attendance occurs and expansion is necessary. If you want to reach this stage sooner rather than later, make plans and establish timelines for the next season. Ask yourself, “What happens when we reach the end zone? What’s next?” Make sure to outline future endeavors and share these with your teams.

Here’s an example of how to communicate standards and expectations, as well as build excitement for what’s next:

Define Excellence: “Excellence is…when every family walking through the door of our church feels loved, known, and inspired. How did you feel when you first came? How can you help others experience that same connection?”

Clarify Expectations: “Every preschool family should receive individual attention during pick-up. A personal one-on-one conversation offering insight into their child’s classroom experience is expected. In addition, you will hand them a newsletter outlining the items parents are most interested in. Review this handout with mom or dad. Ask if he or she has questions. Give him or her the opportunity to share thoughts.”

Build Excitement: “Once our families feel connected and well cared for, I am certain we will see growth. At that point, we will consider adding another toddler room in our preschool area. If we continue to grow, the leadership of the church will consider launching another location nearby.”

In a Multisite Model, as you launch additional locations, you’ll find every campus is unique in size, ethnicity, culture, and economic class. Despite the diversity, your minimum standards of excellence should not vary.

Here’s an example of one way in which eKidz defined excellence and clarified expectations: Quick Check Weekend Observations

Once a quarter, each children’s director at every location was asked to work through this Quick Check document. He or she would talk to team leaders, observe system operations, and make notes of problematic areas. This encouraged campus directors to identify missed opportunities and make adjustments. In addition, by reviewing this document and tweaking it as needed, it allowed the children’s ministry admin team to update, maintain, and communicate centralized standards.

If your church is operating within a multisite strategy or just considering it, it’s important to position yourself for expansion. Excellence will never be reached if not defined. Your teams will consistently fail to meet your expectations if never communicated. Encourage leaders to dream of what could be and prepare as if it’s a certainty, not just a possibility. Work hard at being the best. Position yourself for expansion and watch God move.

For additional Multisite Monday articles, click here.

Jess Bealer

Multisite Monday – 8 Do’s and Don’ts for Volunteer and Staff Kids

Part Two

A couple weeks back I shared 8 Do’s for Volunteer and Staff Kids. Before we jump into today’s content, here’s a brief recap…

Growing up, my parents were the ultimate church volunteers. My mom was a Sunday School teacher, my dad the Sunday School Director and Associate Pastor. When I was a teenager, he announced his call to preach. As much as I loved Jesus, I came to resent the church building itself. I endured long hours inside those brick walls, bored and wishing to be anywhere else. Yet, at 19 years old, I felt God’s call on my life. It was very specific. He wanted to use my own experience to fuel my passion and make church FUN for kids. Over my 17 years in children’s ministry, I’ve strived to create environments that engage and attract children, especially staff and volunteer kids. Today’s post is Part 2 of 8 Do’s and Don’ts for Volunteer and Staff Kids. It will focus on those things that should be avoided in order to connect and minister to the families you see most often. I would encourage you to start with Part 1.

Up until December 2016, and for the past six years, my husband and I had led the family ministry at Elevation in Charlotte, North Carolina, a fast-growing church of 16 locations and nearly 30,0000 attendees. One of the areas in which we found success was called Clubhouse. Clubhouse is an environment designed specifically for staff and volunteer kids. At Elevation, parents attend one worship experience and serve during another. As a result, volunteer and staff kids are at church for more than four hours. Clubhouse ensures they don’t get bored or serve as a distraction.

Clubhouse is an area where kids can eat a snack, hang out with friends, watch movies, play boardgames, engage in video game tournaments, craft, and play with toys. Kids love the low key environment and parents appreciate the energy and effort expended to care for their children while they are busy serving Jesus.

Having a defined strategy is key. Here are 8 things to avoid when establishing a plan to better engage and minister to staff and volunteer kids.

DON’T

DON’T expect them to be exemplary pupils.

  • Kids are kids. While I strongly believe regular church attendance helps young minds develop a more defined and Biblically based sense of morality, it’s important to remember even great kids have bad days, weeks, and years. Believe me, my funny and sweet 11 year-old, Isaac, was not so pleasant when he was three. If I’m being honest, he was a terror. I wanted to apologize every time I dropped him off. If you’re creating a Clubhouse type environment and expecting the kids in attendance to behave like angels that treasure the space, put away games, and listen the first time an adult speaks, you’re going to be sorely disappointed. Clubhouse at Elevation is loud, somewhat chaotic, busy, and FUN! When children feel safe to be who God made them, they’ll start to anticipate that freedom. They’ll begin to look forward to the long hours at church.

DON’T punish them or make them an example because they are “tough enough” to handle it.

  • The kids in your ministry will act out, especially in an environment in which their energy is allowed and encouraged. As with anything in life, a bad choice can result in unfortunate consequences. I’m not suggesting you should let volunteer and staff kids run wild, but make an effort to understand the stress and strain each child endures in order for you ministry to thrive and always err on the side of grace.

DON’T assume their parents are informed about what’s happening in your ministry.

  • The most uninformed parents in your congregation are typically those on staff or serving in a volunteer role. Why? They’re too close to the action. Volunteer and staff parents assume because they spend so much time within the church walls they are “in the know.” These moms and dads rarely read handouts or emails, and they never pay attention to details because they know who to call when they need a reminder. As a ministry leader, it’s incredibly frustrating, but it’s also a reality. Find ways to keep volunteer and staff parents informed. Station a volunteer at Clubhouse pick-up to relay details through face-to-face conversation. Mail handouts directly to their homes with a personalized note. Create disposable take-home bags parents can grab with all the information they need for the week. Make it a point to keep them informed and watch as they begin to understand, support, and appreciate your ministry in a whole new way.

DON’T forget about attention span.

  • Have you ever been in a car with a kid? Whether the trip is 10 hours or 10 minutes, as soon as your foot hits the gas those legendary words fall from their lips, “How much longer?” God gave us these precious, adorable, mini people with boundless energy and zero attention span. If you truly want to help kids love church, you have to keep their minds and bodies occupied. Having staff and volunteer kids repeat your Sunday morning programming multiple times will eventually create problems. When little minds and hands wander, they cause distraction and create mischief. In your Clubhouse environment, keep a steady pace of activities planned. When parents arrive to pick-up, you want their kids asking, “Can’t I stay just a little longer?”

DON’T treat them as you would all other regularly attending children.

  • Staff and volunteer kids will, on average, spend 300% more time at church than a sporadically attending child. If you strategically use this time to invest in them, you’ll find these children will be your most effective marketing tool. They’ll understand the heart of your house and the systems of your ministry and will one day be your most passionate volunteers.

DON’T allow programming constraints to limit what you can do.

  • Just because your main worship service is programmed for 60 minutes and held inside the brick walls of the church building, does not mean your Clubhouse environment should operate within those same constraints. Schedule a game truck. Turn your parking lot into a waterpark. Plan a Easter Egg hunt with mega prizes for your staff and volunteer kids during the Easter Clubhouse experience. Order Happy Meals and milkshakes from McDonald’s and sit on the playground or sidewalk for lunch. Find ways to make your Clubhouse experience feel not normal.

DON’T assume they love church.

  • I shared how, as a child, I loved Jesus but hated the church building. I was often bored and couldn’t relate to the teachings. I’m sure your church is committed to creating fun, relevant environments but every child may not initially view your ministry in a positive light. That’s okay. Treat them kindly. Ask questions. Find out what his or her interests are and make adjustments that will strategically appeal to individual interests.

DON’T babysit them.

  • We all love to be needed, to feel important, to believe that our opinion matters. Kids are no different. If anything, they are seeking validation and acceptance more than anyone else. When you schedule a volunteer and ask them to do little more than pass out gummy snacks, turn on a movie, and check tags at pick-up, kids have no motivation to be more than a number in a ratio. Instead, find adults who will take a vested interest in them as individuals. Make sure your volunteer and staff kids feel important and valued. The lengths to which kids will go to fulfill the expectations you’ve set will surprise you. Challenge them to assume leadership positions among peers. Offer incentives for scripture memorization, and find opportunities for them to take the reigns when possible and be the hands and feet of Jesus.

A successful Clubhouse environment is one of intentionality. Your strategy should be to engage kids, facilitate friendships, and bring laughter, as well as connect families on a more personal level.

In a Multisite Model, bring campus children’s director’s and Clubhouse leaders together frequently to brainstorm ideas and determine what is and is not working. Sharing supplies and strategy can save you time and money in the long run. The secret to success is not a secret at all, it’s collaboration.

If you haven’t already read Part 1, I would encourage you to go back and read the first half of this post. To check out additional Multisite Monday articles, click here.

Jessica Bealer

 

Sample Clubhouse Schedule:

8:00AM Parent Drop-off / Free Play / Morning Movie

8:30AM Breakfast

9:00AM Cleanup

9:15AM Kids transfer to class

9:30AM Clubhouse kids attend first experience

11:00AM Clubhouse volunteers pick up kids from classrooms and transfer them back to the Clubhouse area.

11:15AM Lunch

11:45AM Cleanup

12:00PM Free Play / Video games / Crafting / Art / Boardgames / OCCASIONAL SPECIAL ELEMENT

12:45PM Snack

1:15PM Parent Pick-up

*Note: Clubhouse is available for volunteer and staff kids, ages 3 through 5th grade.

Multisite Monday – 8 Do’s and Don’ts for Volunteer and Staff Kids

Part One

I’m a preacher’s kid. I grew up loving Jesus, but dreading church. I didn’t have a traumatic experience involving the steeple or pews. It just felt irrelevant, time consuming and boring. It wasn’t until early adulthood, I discovered church could be fun. At the age of 19, I took my first position as Children’s Director for a small startup church in East Tennessee. I made a commitment to create engaging environments in which kids would also have FUN, especially volunteer and staff kids.

Fast forward eight years, Frank and I relocated to Charlotte, North Carolina and began attending Elevation Church. We signed up to serve and selected our perspective areas. I chose eKidz Clubhouse. Clubhouse is an environment designed specifically for staff and volunteer kids. At Elevation, parents attend one worship experience and serve during another. As a result, volunteer and staff kids are at church for more than four hours. To ensure they didn’t get bored or serve as a distraction, Clubhouse was created.

Clubhouse is an area where kids can eat a snack, hang out with friends, watch movies, play boardgames, engage in video game tournaments, craft, and play with toys. When introduced, it was an instant success. Kids loved the low key environment and parents appreciated the energy and effort expended to care for their children while they were busy serving Jesus. Our strategy started with Clubhouse, but grew and expanded along with our volunteer base.

The name you select to identify your volunteer and staff kids area is insignificant. Having a defined strategy is key. To get you started, here are eight do’s to help you establish a plan that will have staff, volunteers, and their children falling in love with your church all over again.

DO

Offer them special privileges and opportunities.

  • Allow volunteer and staff kids the chance to serve in a volunteer role a year before their peers are eligible. Offer them small opportunities to lead in the small group in which they attend. Have them lead worship in large group. There’s nothing wrong with taking steps to set them apart from the rest. These are kids who will spend a good amount of time each week within the church walls. Do everything you can to make that time feel special.

Arrange to keep them fed.

  • Provide a warm breakfast and healthy snacks for those arriving early and lunch for those staying throughout the day. Parents will appreciate the assistance because it makes volunteering easier. Kids will appreciate you because, well…you’re giving them food. Kids love to eat!

Invest money to keep them entertained and engaged.

  • A new video game system or basketball goal, on the surface, may seem like a waste of money. I would argue it’s one of the best expenditures you could make. A new game or toy is fun and exciting. A visit from the ice cream truck during Clubhouse hour brings a smile. Happy kids make happy moms and dads. Happy parents equate to higher volunteer and staff retention. If you want to grow your church, invest in those that hold the hearts and the attention of your volunteers and staff, their children.

Consider how every event, activity and extended service will affect them.

  • For the past few years, Elevation has had a choir on stage at Christmas. As you know, the holiday season can be a stressful time in which parents stay busy and kids feel rushed from one activity to the next. Add in hours of choir rehearsal and extra Christmas worship experiences, and you’ve got a recipe for exhaustion and burnout. A couple years back, we made a conscious decision to keep Clubhouse kids busy with a variety of entertaining activities. We scheduled cookie decorating workshops, Christmas movie marathons, Santa visits and more. Being aware of your church calendar and having a plan will help you avoid the question, “How much longer?”

Prepare for them in advance.

  • Arriving on Saturday night or Sunday morning and setting out coloring books and Monopoly isn’t enough. Kids like surprises. They want to be wowed. Book a video game truck. Set up a carnival. Hire an illusionist. Purchase the latest kids blockbuster and schedule an epic movie day. Spend time each week creating a plan that will amaze. It doesn’t need to be expensive, just intentional.

Make them feel special.

  • If your ministry has a prize based reward system, create an extra incentive just for staff and volunteer kids. Make name tags or t-shirts that identify them as someone special. Send gifts on their birthday. Don’t make the mistake of lumping staff and volunteer kids together with the masses. They are the future leaders of your ministry. Treat them as such and watch as they grow into Godly men and women.

Make exceptions to the rules.

  • By nature, I’m a rule follower. I like things a certain way and I want all players in any venture I take to abide by the guidelines set forth at the start. However, there are certain cases in which the old saying, “rules were meant to be broken,” rings true. The way you treat volunteer and staff kids is a prime example. For most of the kids in your Clubhouse area, their parents’ decision to serve also requires a sacrifice on their part. Whether it’s an extra bag of Oreos during snack time, or a blind eye turned towards an electronic gadget, allowing volunteer and staff kids a little extra leeway can go a long way.

Treat them as family.

  • Everyone wants to be included, to have a place to belong. We all want someone to notice our absences and ask about our week. Kids are no different. Show you are thinking of them by sending unexpected gifts: a frisbee at the beginning of summer, a set of mechanical pencils at the start of the school year, a special ornament at Christmas. Make it a point to ask about their latest baseball or soccer game. Celebrate accomplishments together. Families laugh, argue, forgive, play practical jokes on one another, and stand by each other. Your goal is to create a culture that is both welcoming but exclusive, familiar but exciting, intentional but FUN!

In a Multisite Model, each campus or location may have a Clubhouse environment unique to itself. That’s okay. Play to the space you have. If you’re in a permanent high tech facility, 4K movie screens and the latest video game systems may be ideal. If you’re a non-permanent campus, but have access to a gymnasium, invest in sports and field day equipment. If you’re in a ballet studio with mirrors on every wall, schedule hip hop instructors during your Clubhouse hour and teach kids to dance. (Yes, I once did this.) Wherever you find yourself, in whatever situation, there is a solution that works. Get creative. Remember the goal. Make church FUN!

Join us again next Multisite Monday for Part Two of this post, in which we’ll focus on the 8 Don’ts for Volunteer and Staff Kids.

To check out additional Multisite Monday articles, click here.

Jessica Bealer

 

Sample Clubhouse Schedule:

8:00AM Parent Drop-off / Free Play / Morning Movie

8:30AM Breakfast

9:00AM Cleanup

9:15AM Kids transfer to class

9:30AM Clubhouse kids attend first experience

11:00AM Clubhouse volunteers pick up kids from classrooms and transfer them back to the Clubhouse area.

11:15AM Lunch

11:45AM Cleanup

12:00PM Free Play / Video games / Crafting / Art / Boardgames / OCCASIONAL SPECIAL ELEMENT

12:45PM Snack

1:15PM Parent Pick-up

*Note: Clubhouse is available for volunteer and staff kids, ages 3 through 5th grade.

Multisite Monday: Clothespins and Twister

If you follow my husband or I on social media, you know we recently relocated our family of six from Charlotte, North Carolina to Atlanta, Georgia. After leading the family ministry of Elevation Church for the past five years, we felt God calling us to something new, a journey that would require us to move more than 250 miles.

Most of you have experienced the stress and strain of relocation at one point or another. If you happen to be like me, a Type A control freak with a touch of obsessive compulsive, you understand “moving” translates into ground work. What can I do now to prepare for successful tomorrows?

Ten days in and I can say it’s been relatively painless. Frank and I have moved several times in our 16 years of marriage and none of those were as smooth as this one. Without a doubt God was at work, but we’ve always relied on God to guide us to what’s next. So for the past few days, I’ve been asking myself why this particular move was easier than those in the past. Today I had a lightbulb moment. The answer…my experience with multisite. When preparing to launch a new location, I begin by asking myself and my team several key questions. These questions help as I sketch layouts, design rooms, prepare systems and purchase resources. As I prepared our family for an interstate move, I found myself asking these same questions. I hope they help you as much as they’ve helped me.

How many rooms do we need? How many will we have?

Depending on your location, you may or may not have the ideal number of rooms you desire. You may have to combine age groups or make compromises based on your ministry values and priorities. Knowing what you have to work with is your starting point.

How will we ensure safety and standards in the allotted space?

Safety must always be a top consideration. If a classroom cannot be made safe or protected by your security team, it doesn’t make the cut. In a permanent multisite model, this means ensuring every room is thoroughly examined from as early as the blueprint stage. In a non-permanent model, the launching children’s director must see and measure each room before the first purchase order has been made. Excellence in the area of safety is the foundation in which you will build everything else.

What can parents and kids expect to see when they stand at the door of each classroom?

From wall and floor color palettes and furniture selections to age appropriate toys and supply needs, every detail matters. Are your rooms inviting? Are they bright and clean? Does it look like a fun zone or a school zone? It’s important to remember you’re trying to make a great first impression with kids and their parents.

What systems will we have in place to make drop-off and pick-up efficient and effective?

I talk about drop-off and pick-up procedures frequently. These two systems can make or break your ministry. Efficient drop-off systems take into account the quickness of your processes, while effectiveness allows for connectivity during each transition. When preparing to launch a location, its crucial to consider both.

How can we be prepared for anything and everything that may occur?

When a mom asks if you have an extra bottle because she left the one she prepared sitting on the kitchen counter, will you have one to offer? When a preschooler on the playground wets her dress because she was having too much fun for a bathroom break, will you have a change of clothes? When a boy in your 3rd grade small group shares that he woke up late and didn’t have a chance to eat breakfast, will you provide a healthy snack? What about rainy day activities? Vomit clean-up? Stainless steel wipes to keep water fountains sparkling clean? Extra vacuum cleaners for between service touch-ups? Gluten free and allergy considerate snack alternatives? Dissolving bottle labels to eliminate formula mix-ups? Wax paper sheets to protect the diaper changing pad cover? Dishwashing nets so bottle nipples and pacifiers stay in place and are sanitized thoroughly?

Maybe you’re thinking these items are excessive or a waste of money. I would contend that one or two fully engaged families will give more annually than all of these expenses combined. Families that feel well cared for will care for your ministry. Every detail matters. Every resource purchased creates an opportunity to serve those God has entrusted to you.

In a multisite model, it’s imperative to conduct a mock experience in every classroom or theater prior to launch. You need to know, in advance, your weak points, missing supplies and volunteer concerns. The only way to catch the smallest of details is to schedule a full run-through. Have volunteers check their children in and drop them off in their assigned rooms. Plan programming as you would during any normal weekend experience, and offer volunteers a way to communicate feedback and request additional supplies.

I’ve had the opportunity to launch the children’s ministry of 16 locations. My first launch for Elevation Church was a non-permanent campus in a local high school. We transformed classrooms into kid-friendly environments using pipe and drape to cover the walls and foam puzzle mats on the floor. During our scheduled run-through we noticed two major problems. In our baby and toddler rooms, curiosity had our young walkers tugging open the drape to peek behind the colorful makeshift walls. In our Clubhouse room (the area set aside for staff and volunteer kids) only a handful of children were interested in watching the featured movie or playing the video games provided. Most were bursting with energy and desired more interactive play. In the grand scheme of things, these two problems may seem inconsequential, but when safety is your #1 value and volunteers are the lifeblood of your ministry, finding viable solutions is a must.

Clothespins and Twister. One Walmart run and $20 later, we were set for launch Sunday. If you’re preparing for launch season, make sure to ask the right questions and schedule multiple run-throughs. Laying the ground work today will set you up for success tomorrow.

And if you’re moving, I wish you all the best. Remember…asking the right questions and laying the ground work is key to success in that venture as well.

I hope you’ll join me again next Multisite Monday as we discuss Clubhouse, an area designed to keep staff and volunteer kids loving church.

For additional Multisite Monday articles, click here.

Jessica Bealer

Multisite Monday – 3 Reasons I Prefer Non-Permanent Locations

In my tenure, I’ve launched the children’s ministry of 19 multisite locations, 13 of which were non-permanent. Each one holds a special place in my heart. Every launch was an adventure, a learning experience in which I’m grateful for. However, if I’m being honest, those non-permanent launches are just a bit sweeter. I make no excuses. I simply prefer non-permanent locations to permanent ones. Here’s why.

COST

In most circumstances, the expense to launch a non-permanent location is well below that of their permanent counterpart. At Elevation, the cost to launch a non-permanent campus is around 10% of the expense of constructing a new building or retrofitting an existing one. Imagine what’s possible with that kind of savings.

What this means for your ministry

  • You can reallocate funds to staffing or other resources.
  • You can launch additional locations with the money you save.
  • You can try “test run” campuses, in which you determine interest in a certain geographic location or with a particular demographic.

VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCE

Volunteers that choose to stand with you through a non-permanent launch season experience camaraderie and fulfillment unknown to volunteers serving at a permanent location. The work is hard, but the payoff is indescribable.

What this means for your ministry

  • You will never have to question your volunteers’ commitment or loyalty. If someone is willing to arrive early to set-up and stay late to tear-down, you can be assured he or she understands the vision and is committed to see it come to fruition.
  • Your volunteers will experience a greater sense of unity because it takes teamwork and harmony to make a non-permanent location happen each and every week.
  • Certain team members will grow to love the set-up and tear-down process. They’ll become fluid in all things pipe and drape and puzzle flooring. These “experts” will most likely be the first to sign up and lead the charge for your next non-permanent launch.

PARENT EXPERIENCE

When parents pull into the parking lot of a permanent church facility, they are expecting to be impressed. They want your building to be state of the art with a high end design. They expect classrooms to be beautiful and systems to be flawless. It’s often difficult to meet their unspoken demands. The exact opposite is true for non-permanent locations. Parents don’t know what to expect. They hope it’s clean and safe. That’s the minimum, but anything beyond that is often considered a bonus. Now imagine if you could create an excellent environment in a non-permanent setting. Not only would you meet parents’ expectations, but you would exceed them.

What this means for your ministry

  • When you exceed expectations, parents will make allowances they might not otherwise be comfortable with. Essentially, they grant you grace for the occasional mishap or mistake, and they overlook the school trophy case sitting just outside your classroom.
  • When they encounter unexpected excellence, parents will brag on your ministry to friends, family, coworkers, and neighbors. Positive publicity is always a plus.
  •  When parents notice the effort you’ve expended to create a great experience for their child, in an imperfect environment, they feel the need to contribute, and are more willing to sign up to serve.

If you’ve been considering a non-permanent launch, I challenge you to do the research, have a plan, and take a leap. In our small transient world of technology, where a company like Uber, with no storefront, is a global success, Amazon is the world’s leading retailer, and food trucks are all the rage, the legitimacy of the local church is no longer defined by walls or a steeple. If you’re committed to a multisite strategy, don’t discount the effectiveness or efficiency of the non-permanent model. It just might be the solution you’ve been looking for to advance God’s Kingdom and grow your church.

Note: Just like with anything else, every season must eventually come to an end. As much as I love non-permanent locations, I also believe there comes a time when the next logical step is to either shut down the non-permanent location because it isn’t seeing the level of success you anticipated, or it’s time to transition to a permanent location because it’s established a track record of growth. That timeframe is usually around the three year mark.

I hope you’ll join me again next Multisite Monday as we discuss Clubhouse, programming that ensures volunteer and staff kids at every location LOVE coming to church.

For additional Multisite Monday articles, click here.

Jessica

Multisite Monday – The Magical Lanyard

So technically there’s nothing magical about the VIP lanyard that eKidz gives to every first-time guest during that initial check-in process, but what happens as a result is nothing short of a Diagon Alley or Hogwarts phenomenon.

It was designed for children, ages 3 and up, and serves four distinct purposes.

1 – The lanyard is a 4″ by 4″ square card printed with the VIP branding and secured by black plastic lacing. It’s bulky enough to grab the attention of staff and volunteers. It lets everyone know this particular child is a first-time guest and thus given extra attention, high fives, and dozens of warm greetings. It’s enough to make even the shiest of kids feel welcome and accepted.

2 – Kids are encouraged to take their lanyard and head to the information area to receive their First-Time Guest Gift, a custom slap bracelet branded with the eKidz logo. If kids head to the information area, parents will also. It’s a great strategy to engage with a first-time family, answer questions, and obtain feedback.

3 – Kids are encouraged to bring the lanyard back the next time they visit to receive their Second-Time Guest Gift, a custom glow-in-the-dark eKidz t-shirt. You may be thinking, “Aren’t you bribing them to come back?” Yes, that’s exactly the point. We want kids to come back and if a secondary prize achieves that mission, I’m okay with it.

4 – In large group, a kid wearing the VIP lanyard is automatically given bonus points for the game. Those points are “just enough” to give his or her team the edge over all other competitors to ensure a win. Yes…we rig the game. Remember, the goal is to create the best possible experience so kids will want to come back. In a kid’s mind, is there anything better than winning? Here’s where the magic happens. Regularly attending kids know that to win the game, they need a first-time guest on their team. That means as soon as a lanyard wearing child walks in the door, every kid in the room wants him or her on their team. Instant camaraderie. Immediate acceptance and belonging.

I LOVE an intentional first-time guest strategy, and my favorite part of the VIP process in eKidz at Elevation is the lanyard. In a multsite model, it’s important to synch your systems so that each guest at every location has the same experience and receives the same gifts.

Whatever your first-time guest process, it should serve to achieve the following.

  • It needs to make your guests feel special, as if you were waiting on them and are now celebrating their arrival.
  • It should have perceived value so there is incentive to return.
  • It needs to simplify the check-in process for subsequent visits.
  • It must, ultimately, help to establish a connection between their family and your ministry.

I hope you’ll join me again next Multisite Monday as we talk about family parking, umbrellas, and start times.

Jess Bealer

For additional Multisite Monday articles, click here.